Plagiarism Resources

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General Information

1. Plagiarism and the Web. General information on plagiarism including educational strategies and resources for deterring plagiarism. [1]


2. Coastal Carolina University. Outline of a lecture on plagiarism. [2]


6. Plagiarism in Colleges in USA. Discusses plagiarism from a legal perspective. [3]


7. University of Maryland School of Law. Great examples. PDF[4]


8. University of Missouri-Kansas City School of Law. Good advice on avoiding plagiarism to share with students.[5]


9. Virtual Salt: Anti-Plagiarism Strategies for Research Papers. Comprehensive article on plagiarism.[6]


10. University of Pennsylvania Law School. Great PowerPoint presentation. PPT[7]


11. George Washington University. Very specific Q + A format regarding plagiarism.[8]


12. A Brief Guide to Avoiding Plagiarism. This extremely well-written website is geared toward graduate students in nonlegal disciplines. However, it contains an excellent list of "Rules for Proper Attribution" and a checklist of "Ways to Avoid Plagiarism" which apply to law students as well. [9]

Detection Sources

12. Turnitin.Com[10]


13. Yahoo.Com[11]


14. Google.Com[12]


16. Ithenticate.Com[13]


17. Plagiarism dot Org[14]


18. Canexus: EVE2[15]


19. M4-sofware[16]


20. The Plagiarism Resource Site Charlottesville, Virginia. Provides free and downloadable plagiarism detection program, "Wcopyfind." [17]


21. American University in Beirut: Plagiarism. Provides an array of electronic tools to identify plagiarism. Includes a plagiarism section with articles, a plagiarism quiz, copyright information, and Turnitin information. [18]

Other Resources

23. Matthew C. Mirow, Plagiarism: A Workshop for Law Students. Law School student oriented presentation for avoiding plagiarism. PDF[19]


24. Marilyn V. Yarbrough, A Nation Under Lost Lawyers: The Legal Profession at the Close of the Twentieth Century, 100 Dick. L. Rev. 677 (1996). The author examines the mixed messages that law professors and other members of the legal community, like judges, unwittingly convey to students regarding plagiarism.


25. Napolitano v. Princeton University, 453 A.2d 263 (N.J. Super. 1982). Interesting case regarding a student suing the University for sanctions received following a finding of plagiarism.


26. Robert D. Bills, Plagiarism in Law School: Close Resemblance of the Worse Kind? 31 Santa Clara L. Rev. 103 (1990). Statistics regarding incidences and treatment of plagiarism based on a survey of ABA accredited law schools. Good examples of plagiarism and good information on avoiding plagiarism for students. (Can be found on HeinOnline)[20]


27. Patsey W. Thomley, In Search of a Plagiarism Policy, 16 N. Ky. L. Rev. 501 (1989). Section V contains Louis J. Sirico's "Primer on Plagiarism," which is very informative. (Can be found on HeinOnline)[21]